Parents Inc: Why You Should Co-Parent Like a Business

Parents Inc: Why You Should Co-Parent Like a Business
Audrey Cade

By Audrey Cade | May 23rd, 2017

Most people know the difference between a personal versus a professional relationship. A personal relationship is usually a friendship that includes voluntary sharing of time, knowing intimate details about one another, and is a more relaxed partnership wherein the parties can be their true, uninhibited self. A professional relationship tends to be more reserved. Information is more guarded, people tend to be on their best behavior, and the relationship is usually confined to specific times and places.

Have you noticed that people you associate with as business colleagues aren’t always individuals you would choose to socialize with outside of a meeting? You may not have much in common with them on a personal level; but, you manage to accomplish goals together because you have a mutual benefit in the success of your professional partnership.

I may not have much in common with Brenda in accounting or my client, Carl; but, I know that if I need to get a job done, we can push personal feelings aside to take care of business.

Now, imagine you are divorced and facing a decade of continuing to interact with your ex to raise children you share.

The prospect of frequent conversations with someone you can barely stand, let alone sitting together during a dance recital or agreeing on a child’s medical issue can seem nearly impossible!

A divorce won’t succeed in erasing this person from your life when you are required to co-parent; but, this does not mean that you must suffer all the way until your child’s high school graduation.

Let me invite you to consider rearranging your thought processes related to your relationship with your ex. Obviously, a divorce won’t succeed in erasing this person from your life when you are required to co-parent; but, this does not mean that you must suffer all the way until your child’s high school graduation. Your personal relationship with your ex was not successful, as evidenced by your divorce; but, this does not mean that you and your ex cannot still have a very positive and effective relationship — as a business!

Think about business partners:

So, what would co-parenting look like, applying a business model?

Why should you consider becoming a “business” partner with your ex?

As with real businesses, every partnership must find its own way to become as productive and successful as possible. Few businesses operate without a hitch on their first day. Especially if you’ve been in battle as a divorced former couple, it will take time to overcome the hard feelings of the past and adopt new ways of associating.

With patience and perseverance, you can see tremendous returns on your investment. You will be less apprehensive about exchanges with your ex, your children will become more calm and secure in the knowledge that mommy and daddy can get along and have their priorities in the right place.

Businesses remain successful through willingness to adapt with the times. If the way you and your ex co-parent is stressful and ineffective, it may be time to take the business approach!

Audrey Cade

Audrey Cade


Audrey Cade is an author and blogger focusing on the interests of divorced and re-married women, stepmoms, blended families, and co-parents.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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