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Worthy Divorce

What to Do with Your Engagement Ring After Divorce?


No matter how long your marriage lasted, the engagement ring – a symbol of hope for a lifetime of love – remains important. So what do you do with the ring after your love has left the nest? Here, we’ll take a look at some of the most popular ways to handle the question of what to do with your engagement ring after a divorce, plus we’ll cover important aspects of engagement ring etiquette for divorce.


You may be among the rare women who feel like giving the ring back to your ex, and if you do, that’s perfectly fine. You might decide that you want to save the ring and pass it down to another family member or even have it made into another piece of jewelry. You might also decide to leverage the cash value of your engagement ring and sell it to raise money for something else, pay for a vacation, or even get revenge on your ex as some of the women in the following stories have done. Keep on reading to get some great ideas for what to do with your engagement ring after divorce.

Give it Back to Your Ex


If he paid a high price for your perfect engagement ring, your ex is probably not going to give it up easily. At the same time, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s his to take back. You might already know that engagement ring etiquette dictates that the engagement ring should be returned to the man if an engagement is broken up by mutual agreement or if the woman is the one who calls the wedding off. If an engagement is broken by the man, the woman should keep the engagement ring and do whatever she likes with it. But what about engagement ring etiquette rules for divorce?


In the event that you and your ex had an agreement that the engagement ring should be returned to him in case of divorce, you will need to return it to him. This is particularly true if the ring is one of his family’s heirlooms.


The pros of giving your ring back to your ex are mainly emotional. Returning it rids you of the feelings you experience when you see the ring, and that can help you move on with your life. Additionally, if he had even a little bit of a claim to the ring, returning it will also eliminate any pressure you’re feeling – and it will give you one more way to sever your ties with him once and for all.

The cons of returning an engagement ring to your ex are both emotional and financial. First, if you’re still attached to the ring and feel like keeping it, you’ve got to find a way to eliminate those emotions, maybe by purchasing yourself a replacement to wear on your right hand as a symbol of your independence and as a gift to help you get off to a new start in life. While it won’t erase the pain entirely, a nice piece of jewelry can serve as a good distraction and remind you that you’ve got your whole life ahead of you.


Second, if you have to return your engagement ring to your ex, you miss out on the opportunity to trade it for something you might want or need. Even a small engagement ring represents money in the bank, and that’s something all of us like to have.

Keep it Sentimental

If you’re still in love with your diamond ring and want to keep it around, by all means do just that. Keep the ring to hand down to a daughter or granddaughter in the future, or give it to a son or grandson to present to his intended. If you’d like to keep enjoying your diamond’s sparkle, consider having the ring melted down and made into a diamond pendant that you can wear, or that can be handed down to a daughter or granddaughter. If the ring has more than one stone and you have several children you would like to present with jewelry, you can easily use the diamonds, along with any gemstones and the metal from the setting to have several custom necklaces, rings, or other items made.


Keeping your diamond comes with quite a few pros. You get to continue to enjoy its sparkle, and if your divorce was amicable, then it might bring happy memories of your marriage. Second, if you decide to make it into a new piece of jewelry, it really does represent a new start in life while reminding you of where you’ve been. A deep family connection remains, and future generations will benefit as the ring or jewelry made from it is passed on from one person to the next.


If, however, your divorce was an ugly one that caused emotional distress to other family members, they might not want to see the diamond or have it passed on to them. But feelings might soften over time, so consider keeping it hidden away for a while if you really want to keep it but others want nothing to do with it. After all, you can still sell it later if you need the money!

Get Cash for it


With just a few exceptions, engagement ring etiquette for divorce says that the ring is the woman’s to keep whether the broken marriage lasted two days or two decades. But what happens if you’re not at all attached to your old engagement ring and never want to see it again? You don’t have to leave it gathering dust in your drawer where you occasionally see it and wonder why things happened the way that they did. Instead, you can sell it online with Worthy for the highest bid and get cash for it in a matter of days!


There are really no cons to getting cash for your engagement ring, unless you’re still emotionally attached to it and want to keep it. And, if this is the case, do hold on to it until you feel ready to part with it. Diamonds hold their value and you can sell your ring at any time in the future, once you’re certain that you can move on.


The pros are many – you get rid of the ring, you’re no longer reminded of your ex, and you can finance your new projects and get a fresh life start!

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Have Fun With it!

Now that you know more about engagement ring etiquette for divorce, there are some ways you can have fun with the money you make after selling an engagement ring that you don’t want to keep or pass on.


There are many ways to use the money you make from selling your diamond to have some fun. How about spending the cash on a nice vacation, a new car, making a down payment on a house, or just remodeling the one you live in now? After all, there are probably some unwanted reminders of your ex there, such as that man cave he insisted on just before you found out he wasn’t really the one for you. If you remarried, the ring you no longer need can help you pay for a honeymoon with your new husband. Talk about sweet revenge.


If you really want your ex’s eyes to pop out, you can follow the lead of British woman, Lisa Simmons who hocked her engagement ring just after the divorce specifically to pay for breast augmentation. Imagine the look on his face when he saw her next! Cosmetic procedures are costly and not usually covered by insurance, so if there’s a little bit of work you’ve considered having done, this is a great way to get the money to pay for it and move on with your newly single life!


Whether the decision about what to do with your engagement ring after you’ve made the split is a simple one you can make in a snap or a more difficult one involving both your heart and head, the jewelry retains its value. Whether that value is mainly sentimental or is based on resale potential is completely up to you.


Thinking about selling your engagement ring? A similar strategy worked for Demi Moore, who sold her diamond when she got rid of the ring that cheating Ashton Kutcher gave her back in the days when their relationship was fresh. After collecting a cool quarter of a million bucks in the process, the actress has moved on to bigger and better things. While you’re not likely to net the same profit as Moore did, you can probably raise enough for a fun holiday, at the very least!


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  1. Rebecca Boat says:

    If it was expensive or an heirloom from his family it should be returned. Especially if you hadn’t gotten married yet, he shouldn’t have to make payments on something he no longer has, to keep it makes you look vindictive or very greedy or both. Give it back and move on. I have known a few cases where the couple had been married for a long time and the husband had really screwed up and he knew it so out of guilt did not expect or want it back. I my own situation, we were married 28 years, it wasn’t a huge diamond he paid $1,000 in 1970, he had no use for it, nor did I want to take his tools, or his toys, sand rails, Quads, or 5th wheel toy hauler. We didn’t hate each other just got married at 16 and 17, finished school raised 3 great kids put them through college and we were just done. I had earrings made out of the rings and gave them to my daughters, he didn’t want his ring either and as he was a heavy equipment operator he had not worn it in years as he almost lost his finger a few times while working so I gave it to my son. Take what you paid for, give him what he paid for and move on. I also never speak to him or call or ask my kids anything about him. Don’t hate him or wish anything bad for him, but done is done that’s what we paid for a divorce for. We both loved each others families I had the best mother and father. In laws and he felt the same. He continued to camp and stuff with my dad and brother plus a bunch of mutual friends. I didn’t go around his parents house as it wouldn’t have been fair to anyone he might be seeing. I still saw her at baby showers etc.

  2. Thanks , I’ve recently been searching for info about this topic for ages and yours is the best I have discovered till now. But, what about the conclusion? Are you sure about the source?

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